Seminar-A contrasting tale of dynamics: How two different polymers define the shape of bacteria and divide them in half

THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Department of Microbiology and Immunology
presents a seminar by:
Dr. Ethan Garner
John L. Loeb Associate Professor of the Natural Sciences, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Center for Systems Biology, Harvard University
entitled:
A contrasting tale of dynamics: How two different polymers define the shape of bacteria and divide them in half

Abstract: The shape of bacteria is determined by their cell wall, a crosslinked macromolecule that holds them in shape. To grow in defined shapes, or divide half, bacteria must add material into this structure in a spatially controlled manner. The activity of the enzymes that build the cell wall is regulated by small dynamic filaments, homologs of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins. We study the emergent actions of these polymer/enzyme systems by observing their in vivo dynamics while conducting chemical and genetic manipulations. These dynamics have revealed the polymers controlling cell elongation and division function in very different ways.

Sponsored by:

The Department of Microbiology and Immunology

Tuesday, January 15, 2019 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm

Location:
Life Sciences Centre, LSC 3
2350 Health Sciences Mall
Hosted by
Madison Bolger-Munro (Dr. Gold Lab)